Eskimo diet promotes a healthy heart

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omega fatty

High-quality fatty acids support cardiovascular health, independent Eskimo study reveals

A study of Yup’ik Eskimos in Alaska, who on average consume 20 times more omega-3 fats from fish than most Americans shows that a high intake fish helps prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, even though obesity was prevalent among them.

Daily diet of fish

Their daily diet of salmon, sardines and other fatty fish have high amounts of DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (Eicosapentaenoic acid) that has hundreds of studies that suggest omega-3s may provide some benefits to a wide range of diseases such as cancer, asthma, depression, cardiovascular disease, ADHD, and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. (WebMD)

Side effects of obesity didn’t affect Eskimos

The study, led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center together with the Center for Alaska Native Health Research, found that obese persons (among the Yup’ik Eskimos) with high levels of omega-3 fats had triglyceride and CRP concentrations did not differ from those of normal-weight persons.

It appears that the high intakes of omega-3-rich seafood protected Yup’ik Eskimos from some of the harmful side effects of obesity,” says lead author Zeina Makhoul, Ph.D.

Take a fatty acid supplement if you don’t consume fish

According to Mayo Clinic, you can take a fish oil supplement to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes. In addition, omega fatty acid supplements can help treat high triglycerides, high blood pressure and may improve symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Eating dietary sources of fish oil such as tuna or salmon at least twice a week is associated with the reduced risk of developing heart problems. It makes simple sense that if you don’t like fish, you can take high-quality omega fatty acid supplements.

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