Herbal food supplements not recommended for persons with kidney problem or in dialysis

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Herbal supplements not recommended for those with kidney diseases

Herbal food supplements may be harmful to persons with kidney disease according to the National Kidney Foundation (NKF). The reason is simple, The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate herbal supplements for dose, content, or its pureness.

For a person’s safety, herbal supplement is not recommended, “It’s an unknown territory, please avoid herbal supplements, says Belinda Jim, MD

Aristolochic acid in herbs

Some herbal supplements have aristolochic acid, which is harmful to kidneys. Herbal supplements made in other countries may contain harmful heavy metals. Ingredients like potassium, and phosphorus, in particular, should be limited in the diet of people with kidney disease especially for those on dialysis.

Potassium is a mineral that may need to be limited in the diet of people with kidney disease especially for those on dialysis. Herbal supplements that have potassium include:

Alfalfa
American Ginseng
Bai Zhi (root)
Bitter Melon (fruit, leaf)
Black Mustard (leaf)
Blessed Thistle
Chervit (leaf)
Chicory (leaf)
Chinese Boxthorn (leaf)
Coriander (leaf)
Dandelion (root, leaf)
Dulse
Evening Primrose
Feverfew
Garlic (leaf)
Genipap (fruit)
Goto Kola
Japanese Honeysuckle (flower)
Kelp
Kudzu (shoot)
Lemongrass
Mugwort Noni
Papaya (leaf, fruit)
Purslane Sage (leaf)
Safflower (flower)
Sassafras
Scullcap
Shepherd’s Purse
Stinging Nettle (leaf)
Turmeric (rhizome)
Water Lotus

There are also herbal plants, tea, and roots that should be avoided such as:

Astragalus
Barberry
Cat’s Claw
Apium Graveolens
Creatine
Goldenrod
Horsetail
Huperzinea
Java Tea Leaf
Licorice Root
Nettle
Stinging Nettle
Oregon Grape Root
Parsley Root
Pennyroyal
Ruta Graveolens
Uva Ursi
Yohimbe

Some can interact with prescription drugs

Many herbal supplements can interact with prescription drugs. A few examples are St. Johns Wort, echinacea, ginkgo, garlic, ginseng, ginger, and blue cohosh. If you have a kidney transplant you are especially at risk, as any interaction between herbal supplements and medicines could put you at risk for losing your kidney.

Instead, persons who suspect to have kidney problems, and are taking herbal supplements, should immediately stop, carefully observe symptoms and seek immediate medical attention.

(Reference: Kidney.org)

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. While the testimonies are encouraging, additional tests with a larger sample size are needed to validate the findings. Results will vary depending on the facts and circumstances of each person. If you have concerns, please consult your physician.

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