Can this food supplement work to lower blood sugar?

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laminine blood sugar level trial
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Can Laminine work to lower blood sugar

Laminine Food Supplement has become one of the most popular food supplement that bears the reputation of supporting blood sugar level control. The company who manufactures and distributes the product hinges on its core ingredient that they claim has FibroBlast Growth Factor or FGF, which other companies claim is a false attribute.

To show Laminine has a positive side effect on blood sugar, a study was performed in 2014 and 2015 by LifePharm Global Network’s lead researcher, Dr. Edward Andujar, M.D.

Background

Since a lot of Laminine users have claimed it has helped to naturally normalize their sugar levels, volunteer subjects were assessed for 12 weeks taking two supplements daily. Eleven individuals participated in the study. The Hgb A1c test was chosen to measure the effects of Laminine on normal blood sugar levels as opposed to other blood sugar tests because of its accuracy.

Hgb A1c test : The hemoglobin A1c test, also called HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, or glycohemoglobin, is an important blood test that shows how well your diabetes is being controlled. Hemoglobin A1c provides an average of your blood sugar.

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Participants in the experiment

The participants had metabolic syndrome which is basically a group of people with a risk of getting heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. These type of group commonly exhibit increasing levels of glucose intolerance or having high sugar levels. Most of these patients in this category are overweight and have sedentary lifestyles, although not necessarily diabetic.

Group A took one placebo in the morning and one in the evening.
Group B took one Laminine capsule in the morning and one in the evening.
Group C took one Laminine capsule in the morning and one in the evening in addition to their blood sugar medication.

Group A and the two groups receiving Laminine were tested initially at week 0 before administration of placebo or dietary supplement and then at week 12. Diet and exercise were not monitored during the study period. All of the participants in Group C were taking their blood sugar medication prior to participating in the study. Participants in this group were on as few as one and as many as three different medications during the course of the study. These medications included insulin and oral medications.

Test Results

Group A

Of the three random participants in Group A, one experienced no change in Hgb A1c levels while the other two saw their levels rise over the 12-week period
laminine blood sugar table study

Group B

Each of the four participants in Group B (Laminine) experienced a down-regulation in Hgb A1c levels after 12 weeks, with the
greatest normalization exhibited in participant B2.
laminine blood sugar table study

Group C

In Group C (Laminine + blood sugar medication), three of the four participants showed normalizing Hgb A1c levels.
laminine blood sugar table study

What does these test result mean?

Although the sample size was small, after 12 weeks of taking Laminine, the difference in the Hgb A1c (blood sugar test) marker measurements before and after supplementation showed important results in Group B (those that took 2 Laminine capsules/day with no medication). This means that Laminine may have a beneficial effect in helping maintain normal blood glucose for those at risk for developing high blood glucose or diabetes.

For Group C (those that took 2 Laminine capsules + medication for their sugar), showed safety and did not have any side effects nor interfere with their preexisting medication. However, one participant in Group C had been taking insulin with Laminine and completely tapered off insulin and maintained stable blood sugar levels by the conclusion of the 12 weeks.

In conclusion, taking at least 2 capsules of Laminine (original) per day supports the control of sugar level in individuals who have high sugar levels. It also shows that it may also help those with diabetes, taking insulin to speed up and maintain a stable glucose level, or anyone who are pre-diabetic.

Doubts and possibilities

Although the study remains conclusive, the number of participants is small. A 12-days trial also does not conclusively prove it can have lasting effects or can stape of those taking insulin. It is, therefore, safe to assume that anyone who is diabetic may indeed take Laminine, but removing medication should be done with the permission of his/her doctor, as one participant did.

It is known that nine-day fertilized avian egg extract that is not denatured with heat processing could retain the Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) activity. Because growth factors react with receptor sites on somatic cells, this activity could support glucose absorption. Perhaps the only scientific basis for this experiment is this study, but customer testimonials on the product have proven to be valuable.

The risk is low if you take the product, but should exercise caution, as Laminine is relatively a new product and its adverse and long-term side effects may be unknown. Furthermore, taking maintenance food supplements should be done with your PHysician’s permission, to rule out possible contraindication, which fortunately did not show in this experiment.

Is the trials honest and reputable?

We can only base it on the reputation Laminine’s manufacturer have. LifePharm Global Network appears to be a legitimate company, and Dr. Andjuar is registered as a Medical Doctor and is confirmed as the head Physician/Research head of the LPGN Research Team.

Based on also on user testimonials on blood sugar levels and diabetes, the legitimacy of LifePharm’s study that FGF supplementation can help people with Diabetes Type 2, appears to be valid, but we do not recommend it to replace any blood sugar or diabetic or insulin supplement.


DISCLAIMER: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.


REFERENCES:
1 Ekelund U, Anderssen SA, Froberg K, Sardinha LB, Andersen LB, Brage S, et al. (2007) Independent associations of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness with metabolic risk factors in children: the European youth heart study. Diabetologia 50: 1832–1840.
2 Healy GN, Matthews CE, Dunstan DW, Winkler EA, Owen N (2011) Sedentary time and cardio-metabolic biomarkers in US adults: NHANES 2003–06. Eur Heart J 32: 590–597.
3 Elin Ekblom-Bak, Annika Rosengren, Mattias Hallsten, Göran Bergström, and Mats Börjesson. Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Sedentary Behaviour, and Physical Activity Are Independently Associated with the Metabolic Syndrome, Results from the SCAPIS Pilot Study. PLoS One. 2015; 10(6): e0131586.

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